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Network 50

50 People Who Made the Internet a Better Place in 2016

Mozilla’s mission is keeping the Internet healthy—ensuring the web is a global public resource, open and accessible to all. It’s an essential mission, but also a daunting one, one that Mozilla can’t achieve alone. That is why we’re committed to fueling the broader Internet health network: individuals and organizations around the globe working on topics like online privacy and security, open innovation, decentralization, digital inclusion and web literacy. Working together, this network can have an outsized, positive impact on Internet health.

We are amazed and inspired by the fantastic contributions of these network members and wanted to recognize members whose contributions have been critical to this mssions; Network50 is our attempt to do so. It is an accolade for network members who have done outstanding Internet health work over the past 18 months, with the winners representing the diversity of the network.

They speak different languages, work in different fields, and belong to different organizations but they are all committed to a better web and to the health of the internet. These are the people behind recent victories in the realms of public policy, open science, digital inclusion, ethical technology and other critical areas.

To meet the full Network50, please click on their names below (alphabetical, by first name). And join Mozilla in thanking these individuals for their outstanding work.

Will we see your name on this list next year?


Amel Ghouila

Amel Ghouila is a Bioinformatician at Institut Pasteur de Tunis, an Open Science advocate and a Regional Ambassador for Technovation, the international competition for girls between 10 and 18 years old interested in developing mobile applications to solve a community problem. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Study Group Lead. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Amel is an outstanding network member, contributor, and connector. She leads a Study Group in Tunis, and has brought in other Study Group leads to expand the Open Science mission. She is involved with H3ABioNet, a Pan-African Bioinformatics network comprising 32 Bioinformatics research groups that focuses on developing Bioinformatics capacity within Africa. She hosted a Global Sprint site at the Institute de Pasteur, helping bring more scientists into the Open Science movement. She has been a willing and eager mentor to many others, and a strong advocate for the Open movement.


Alex Wafula

Alex Wafula is a software professional and a community activist. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Mozilla Rep, Firefox Student Ambassador, and researcher. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Alex has been a leader of the Kenyan and then the East African community for many years and continues to evolve and grow as a facilitative leader who supports others to succeed. Most recently, he was an outstanding contributor to the recent Digital Skills Observatory program. As part of that project, he helped design, develop, and execute 4 digital skills workshops and an accompanying Android app, helping engage the community in a consistent and substantial manner. He has a strong history of contribution to the Internet health movement as a Mozilla Rep, a Firefox Student Ambassador, a Wikimedia Editor and also as a Wikimedia Kenya Board Member.


David Bild

David Bild works as the Coordinator of Teen and Young Adult Programs at the Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive Chicago member and advisor. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

David is one of the most active, prolific and collaborative members of Hive Chicago, and has led, supported, connected, spread, and shared a dozen or more projects in that community. David works in the open, using open source tools, to create participatory, inclusive, and interest-driven programs for youth in Chicago; as an example, his Hive Mapping Cooperative project focused on enabling teens and educators to collect, visualize, and share media-rich spatial data using free and open source mapping, data collection, and data sharing tools. In recognition of his contributions, he was nominated by his peers to serve an 18-month term on the Hive Chicago Advisory Committee. He has also been a regular attendee and session leader at MozFest and a collaborator across hubs.


Kim Wilkens

Kim Wilkens is an educator and Founder of Tech-Girls, a volunteer-based, not-for-profit that works with parents, educators, and partners to provide training, resources and relationships needed to spark girls interest in STEM. As part of the internet health movement, she has been an active participant in Mozilla Learning activities, and as a MozFest volunteer. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50".

Kim is an award-winning local organizer, advocate for web literacy and women-in-tech, and an educator who regularly develops new web literacy activities, advancing the mission Internet health through her many programs. As an example, Kim created her own after-school program to teach web literacy to girls who have typically been considered outsiders in tech, organized a local SPARK hackathon for youth and collaborated on MozFest 2016 to create  Learning Hub space titled "Demystify the Web!". She has been an active and consistent contributor to curriculum, messaging and events over multiple years. Events like SPARK and organizations like Tech-Girls are testaments to her success in helping others learn, make, and organize.


Shreyas Narayanan Kutty

Shreyas Narayanan Kutty is a committed Internet health advocate and contributor. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Club Captain, Mozilla Rep, MozFest volunteer and a Club Regional Coordinator. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

As an active collaborator in developing the strategy, and growing the community, Shreyas has been key to the growth of Mozilla Clubs program since before its inception. He has mobilized and energized his local community in India, and as Regional Coordinator has trained and mentored 10+ Mozilla Club Captains. He is a collaborator and network builder; in his final year at university, Shreyas secured the cooperation of Wikimedia and Google Developer Group, to organize a Maker Party event that drew over 700 participants. He has also been a key volunteer at Mozilla Festival and other events. He has a strong history of contribution to the Internet health movement as a part of the internet health movement, and also as a volunteer for the Open Source Initiative.


Ariam Mogos

Ariam Mogos works as the Learning Lead for UNICEF's Office of Innovation. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive NYC member and MozFest participant. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Ariam Mogos is a dedicated youth development advocate, a social entrepreneur and a highly respected educator and learning technologist. She has been an active member of Hive NYC for several years, both as an organizational representative and as an individual member. In her previous position at Global Kids, she integrated web literacy into her program curricula, reaching thousands of students in public schools throughout NYC. The Young Innovators Squad program that she started mentors young people on how to share their technical skills and experiences with their peers. Outside of NYC, she has designed maker spaces and community-based coding programs for girls and urban refugees in Sierra Leone, Kenya, and South Africa. The Internet health movement is stronger because of her efforts on multiple fronts.


Brian Bot

Brian Bot works as a Principal Scientist at Sage Bionetworks. He has been a part of the internet health movement as an Open Science participant. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Brian Bot is an outstanding community member with a firm foundation in open science initiatives and mobile development. At Sage Bionetworks, he is leading research on participatory biomedical research studies, with the objective of furthering our understanding of the application of open source practices in various settings. His work aims to re-envision how scientists can ensure reproducibility of their research results and communicate complex science to one another and to the public at large. He is an exceptionally active network member, advocating for open science best practices through his work with Mozilla and outside.


Noah Swartz

Noah Swartz works as Staff Technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. He has a long history of involvement with the internet health movement as a MozFest facilitator, and privacy advocate. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Noah Swartz is an avid supporter and developer of and for the open internet, a free software/culture advocate, and an untiring partner and advocate for web privacy. Over the years, Noah has facilitated various sessions at MozFest to help others better understand the importance of privacy and the nefarious tools used by those who are tracking and collecting data on users. His work with Privacy Lab, in partnership with Mozilla, is an example that underscores his community-building efforts, through which he mentors, inspires, and helps others succeed. The Privacy Lab has successfully grown the privacy-oriented web community and has exposed many people to the ideas, concerns, and trade-offs involved with online privacy. He has a long-standing involvement in the Internet health movement, including his current work at Electronic Frontier Foundation, and his prior work as a free software activist at the MIT Media Lab..


Rita Geladze

Rita Geladze is the Founder of Educators Camp, a network of educators dedicated to providing exceptional professional development services, youth-driven curriculum design, and capacity building workshops. She has been active in the internet health movement as Hive NYC member and is part of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Rita Geladze has contributed as a key Hive NYC leader in many ways over the past few years - from facilitating small group discussions to leading workshops and developing web literacy curriculum. She cares deeply about online privacy and web literacy and has been a dedicated advocate and educator in pushing Mozilla's priorities and activities. Rita has also facilitated digital literacy workshops for NYC youth and remains a phenomenal partner and facilitator of analog and creative ways to embrace and teach web literacy skills.


Baratang Miya

Baratang Miya is the Founder and CEO, GirlHype - Women Who Code - a not-for-profit that provides programming and app development training for girls and young women. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Regional Coordinator. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Baratang is a key leader of the Mozilla Clubs for Women and Girls program. A self-taught coder, she has been sharing her skills and experiences with women and girls through her leadership of Mozilla Clubs and her own organization, GirlHype, which she founded 12 years ago. As a Regional Coordinator, she oversees execution of 5 clubs in Cape Town, South Africa. Her success has been amplified by her keen awareness of the challenges of making Mozilla programs and content relevant to people with little access - as in those living in the townships in and around Cape Town. Although she focuses on getting women into STEM, She understands that this is about building women's self-efficacy and confidence, to work in tech or beyond.


Gina Grant

Gina Grant is an educator and Senior Manager of Digital Engagement at the Chicago Architecture Foundation. She has been active in the internet health movement as an invaluable Hive Chicago member. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Gina has been an active and passionate advocate for Hive work in Chicago for many years. In her current role at the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF), she has supported CAF's efforts to openly share their educational resources for use and reuse by others. In her work with CAF and its DiscoverDesign.org platform, Gina routinely helps Chicago youth and internet health movement members use the design process to succeed as novice designers. Gina has been a key player in local efforts to improve interoperability between learning platforms to create a broader and more inclusive learning ecosystem. Her work with developing and sharing Minecraft themed challenges and activities for youth in Chicago has been a great way for young people to learn how to deal with issues of the built environment and civic engagement.


Meghan Hausman

C. Meghan Hausman is a STEM education advocate and currently works as the Extension Program Coordinator for Northeastern Illinois University's Center for College Access and Success, promoting making and makerspaces while coordinating professional development for teachers as well as programming for youth. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive Chicago member, and is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Meghan has been one of the most active contributors to Hive Chicago over the last many years, leading the development of Hive-funded projects, hosting meetups, and making significant and ongoing contributions. Meghan's efforts provide practical examples of creating citywide spaces for open innovation and broadening digital inclusion. She has helped build the strength of our peer professional learning community, by creating a space for professional affinity groups to form around shared problems of practices. Her contributions to the Hive-funded mobile maker space project Maker Mob has taken Hive's work to new audiences, inspiring engagement and participation in making at locations as diverse as block parties and farmers markets.


Duncan Washington

Duncan Washington is a technology professional, researcher, and digital inclusion activist. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Research Analyst and Project Lead, and is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

The Digital Skills Observatory is a critical project, not only for Mozilla but for the digital inclusion movement, and the insights it yields will shape how donors, governments, and foundations think about this critical work. The tremendous progress made on this project would not have been possible without the active leadership, coordination, organization, critical thinking, and technical skills of Duncan. His dedication to the success and impact of the project and his openness to understanding new ideas (and reconfiguring old ones) is an invaluable asset. Duncan has been able to bring not only technical research experience but also a deep team-oriented methodology to the project. His contributions have helped deliver high-quality digital skills training, as well as produce and publicize world-class research documentation that will contribute to open practices.


Madeleine Bonsma-Fisher

Madeleine Bonsma-Fisher is an Open Science advocate and currently a Ph.D. Student at the University of Toronto. She has been active in the internet health movement as an outstanding Study Group Lead within the Science Lab. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Madeleine has been an exceptional leader in the Open Science movement, and her work exemplifies working in the open for the benefit of others. She has been involved with multiple Mozilla Science Lab activities, teaching a session at the first Working Open Workshop and serving as a member of the inaugural Open Leadership Cohort, and a mentor for the Open Leadership Training. She started and nurtured one of the most actively growing Study groups for the past two years - UofTCoders at the University of Toronto. Her coaching and mentorship have been invaluable to other members of the Open Science communities, helping them succeed with their Open Science projects.


Meredith Summs

Meredith Summs is an informal educator, instructional technology specialist, a curriculum developer for the Internet health movement, and currently works as the Associate Director, Learning Design at Mouse. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive NYC member for over five years. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

For the past several years, Meredith has been an active and engaged Hive NYC member, an ally at Mouse and contributor of curriculum on how to connect fun offline activities with web literacy skills needed on the web. She has taught circuitry, web literacy, human-centered design, assistive & adaptive tech, IT and game design. She has developed high-quality web literacy curriculum and training through her work with Mouse, with a focus on connecting fun, offline activities with web literacy skills. She helped develop Kraken the Code, one of the most popular Web Literacy Basics activities and one that has been translated into more than 10 languages. She has also shared her expertise with digital badging, and provided valuable input as part of the update to the Web Literacy Map v2.0.


Rafael Rosa

Rafael Rosa is Vice President of Programs for the Student Conservation Association and was previously the Vice President of Education at the Chicago Academy of Sciences. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive Chicago member, and a past advisory committee member. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Rafael has been a member of Hive Chicago since its inception. He has been instrumental in leading education initiatives that intersect with nature and technology. He has co-led many large city-wide collaborations and was nominated by his peers to serve on our 6-member Advisory Committee. Through his work in the committee, he has led discussions and projects that challenge the ways institutions and organizations engage with under-served communities. In this role, he also mentors new member organizations in the network and provides strategic guidance to Hive leadership. He has been instrumental in updating Hive's mission to clearly align our work with the promise of the Internet for learning.


Tina Verbo

Tina (Kristina) Verbo is a software professional, an active member of the Philippines technical community, and a member of our first cohort of "Network50.” She has been active in the internet health movement as a Club Captain, Firefox Student Ambassador, Mozfest facilitator, Mozilla Rep and a Regional Coordinator.

Tina Verbo has been a long-standing contributor both in the Philippines and globally; she served as a Firefox Student Ambassador starting with the launch of the program, has been involved in the Mozilla Philippines Community as a Mozilla Rep, and serves as a Regional Coordinator for the Mozilla Clubs program. As a Regional Coordinator, she oversees the execution of 11 clubs in her region and advocates for web literacy through workshops, websites, communication channels and more. She has created vital resources on running clubs in schools, in the community and for women. She has translated our materials into her local language helping adapt the program to her local context. Her work gives us a perspective on how MLN resources and materials apply to another language and another culture.


Anthony Negron

Anthony Negron works as the Manager of Digital Programming at the new York Hall of Science (NYHS), helping research, develop and implement innovative digital programming both at NYHS and in partnership with other institutions. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive NYC member and joins our first cohort of "Network50.”

Anthony is one of the original and longest-serving members of the Hive NYC Learning Network, and is deeply committed to the network's values and principles of working openly and collaboratively. As an educator, Anthony is committed to providing quality web literacy experiences to young people throughout NYC, in a variety of settings. He has formed partnerships and contributed his time to several Hive institutions, helping them create their own digital media programs. As a STEM education advocate, Anthony has been instrumental in bringing knowledge to Hive NYC as an active collaborator, thought partner, and community expert.


Anelda van der Walt

Anelda van der Walt is a bioinformatician, a researcher, and entrepreneur. She leads Talarify, an eResearch consulting firm, and worked previously as an eResearch Analyst at the University of Cape Town. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Study Group Lead within the Science Lab. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Anelda is a trailblazer for open science in her native South Africa, and more generally, across Africa. She is an excellent advocate, and an outstanding contributor for diversity, digital inclusion, open access and open science. She has been a Study Group Lead herself and is great connector and resource to other study group leads. She is very passionate about teaching and promoting openness in research and works to help researchers learn and understand how to make their work more open. She moves forward our web literacy mission through curriculum development and delivery of learning materials to audiences that wouldn't normally have access to such materials.


Geoff Millener

Geoff Millener is the Innovation and Technology Programs Manager at the Public Education Foundation Chattanooga, a strong Community Partner, a Mozilla Alum, a Hive Chattanooga member, and a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Geoff is an effective community builder and an advocate for innovation and openness in Learning. He has effectively helped translate the Open Web, Open Leadership principles and Mozilla's larger work to a local context and to an audience of formal educators. His work within the 4K streaming project has been useful in rallying teachers to explore this new arena of technology and collectively work on a curriculum that can be shared across the school district. As a past gigabit team staff member, he has a full understanding of our work and the context of the community and leverages both to support the work as it continues beyond his formal involvement. He has been a stalwart leader in connecting teachers with our effort (and the Internet health movement) and has shown up to volunteer repeatedly over the years.


Ani Martinez

Ani Martinez works as the Community Manager for the Remake Learning Network in the greater Pittsburgh region and beyond. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive Pittsburgh member, Club Captain, and MozFest volunteer. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50”.

Ani is an experienced educator with a focus on tech, advocacy, and inclusion, committed to creating a network of accessible, hands-on problem solvers and educators. She has been a regular, consistent, and enthusiastic contributor to the Internet health movement and Mozilla projects through multiple avenues including Mozilla Clubs, Hive Pittsburgh, and MozFest. Ani has developed communities teaching the web in Pittsburgh, delivers high-quality programs in her local learning spaces and inspires other educators in our networks. She understands her own community, knows how to leverage what Mozilla and the Internet health movement can bring to her community, and has been a friendly and constructive critic for improvement.


Anna Krystalli

Anna Krystalli is an Open Science advocate based in Sheffield and is currently a freelance Research Data Scientist with a background in Ecology. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Project Lead and a MozFest Volunteer and Session Leader. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Anna has been a dedicated and involved member of Mozilla’s Open Science activities and network. She was an active participant in many activities in the network, including Global Sprint, the Working Open Workshop, and the first Open Leadership Cohort, serving as a lead mentor. She planned and led a session at MozFest 2016, and has also delivered on programs through various workshops, including a symposium on reproducible research in behavioural ecology. She helped deliver open science hack days including the OpenCon Berlin Reproducibility Hack. She has catalyzed openness by persuading peers, students and collaborators to adopt open practices. Her work advances the Internet health movement through her contributions towards Open Innovation and Decentralization.


Babitha George

Babitha George is a researcher, a Principal of Quicksand Design Studio, a co-founder of the UnBox Festival and an advocate for social equality and development. She has been active in the internet health movement as a team leader, researcher and IoT program facilitator. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Babitha is a key collaborator and thought partner on the topic of decentralization and digital inclusion, especially within the Global South. She has been a leading light in bringing complex, nuanced, design research into the Internet health movement. She has shown herself to be an excellent leader in the curation of research and in facilitating groups of individuals to have meaningful discussions around Open IoT. She was instrumental in at least three IoT events last year; she hosted the first event in Ahmedabad, India, led the team that conducted user research on privacy and the connected home for the second event, and co-edited the book publication at the third event. She also researched the role of local manufacturing and alternative forms of making as a path to community resilience and decentralization.


Faith Luvuno Zuma

Faith Luvuno Zuma is a researcher and curriculum designer in Kenya. He has been active in the internet health movement as an Open Researcher, and is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Faith was an invaluable contributor to the Digital Skills Observatory. She contributed to creating 5 different research interventions (curriculum, lesson plans and software prototypes), ensuring the success of the project. She wrangled community members, managed logistics, created and iterated on digital skills content and subsequent reports, and accompanied the research team to collect field data. Her contributions - as a role model, project manager, community organizer, mentor, and leader - have helped ensure timely completion of all deliverables.


Fatma Guerfali

Fatma Guerfali is an Assistant Professor at Institut Pasteur de Tunis and an Open Science advocate. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Study Group Lead. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Fatma is an invaluable network member and community builder. She leads a Study Group in Tunis, and as an Open Leadership Cohort member, is actively mentoring others to work and lead in the open. She is involved with H3ABioNet, a Pan-African Bioinformatics network comprising 32 Bioinformatics research groups, that is developing bioinformatics capacity within Africa. Her contributions have helped others in her community, particularly girls and young women, learn the skills they need to participate digitally, and her efforts have been critical in opening research practices to communities that do not have regular access to teaching resources.


Geraldo Barros

Geraldo Barros works as a front-end developer, is a committed young leader in the Internet health movement and is an active contributor to digital inclusion. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Club Captain, Regional Coordinator, and Mozilla Rep. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Geraldo has been an active contributor to the Internet health movement for the last few years. He has successfully launched a Mozilla Club, helped grow many other Mozilla Clubs, serves as a Regional Coordinator for Mozilla Campus Clubs and also is involved as a Mozilla Rep. He is also engaged in the free and open source community in Brazil, and serves as a WoMakersCode leader. He has created a wide variety of curriculum assets that help other clubs and translated and localized other materials into Portuguese to make them more accessible to other club leaders. He has also invested in creating a more inclusive web by helping female leaders in his community and has created spaces for them to learn. His work is empowering more volunteers around Brazil to take the lead and push the Internet health mission forward.


Germania Solorzano

Germania Solorzano works for The Center for College Access and Success (formerly The Chicago Teachers' Center). She was an adjunct faculty member of Columbia College Chicago and taught for over 10 years in the Fiction Writing Department. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive Chicago member and advisory committee member and is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Germania is a Hive Chicago contributor whose programs for youth and educators exemplify a commitment to learning by doing.  She builds active collaborations with peers in the network, shares best practices, and disseminates these learnings through educator outreach programs like the Make, Take, Teach Fair, an event that she helped develop as part of the working group she led. She has also served the network as an Advisory Committee member, guiding the operations of the network and helping plan the next phase of growth. She is dedicated to working in the open and creating spaces in which people can openly collaborate and solve problems.


Aaron Deacon

Aaron Deacon works as the Managing Director of Kansas City Digital Drive and is involved in multiple projects in Kansas City to grow and connect the technology community and also advance innovation and support the entrepreneurship ecosystem. He has been active in the internet health movement in Kansas City and a MozFest volunteer and presenter. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Aaron has been an essential partner - as an individual and as a representative of his organization - in helping advance digital innovation and inclusion in Kansas City, through joint events, outreach, and numerous other ways. He has been a vital partner in supporting outreach, advising on local messaging, providing technical consultation and helping bring additional partners and people to the network, thus growing the Mozilla and the Internet health community in Kansas City. He has also presented at MozFest, and served as an honorary member of the external selection committee for the Gigabit Fund.


Hildah Nyakwaka

Hildah Nyakwaka is a student at the University of Nairobi and an untiring contributor to the East African technology community. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Regional Coordinator. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Hildah is a key contributor to Mozilla’s efforts to extend web literacy to women and girls, and a key driver of the Mozilla Clubs for Women and Girls. In her role as a Regional Coordinator in Kenya, she oversees executive strategy in successfully running 10 clubs in Nairobi and building a local network that supports the education and empowerment of women in her community. Her clubs have enabled women and girls learn the web for the first time or build upon their previous skills to become web literate.  She is an invaluable mentor to the club captains she guides, and helps them succeed through mentorship and constructive feedback. Her contributions to the Internet health movement extend beyond Mozilla, particularly through Jamlab, a co-creation community made of passionate young people who are intent on using the Internet to co-create ideas and bring them alive.


Max Franz

Max Franz is a software engineer, specializing in user-interface design, who currently works at the University of Toronto. He is an open research advocate, within his organization and in the wider community. He has been active in the internet health movement as an Open Project Lead and a MozFest volunteer. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Max has been a huge contributor to Open Science through his participation in many open research and working open initiatives.  He has helped many others in the Mozilla communities understand and adopt open working principles through his contributions and presentations at Global Sprint 2015, Global Sprint 2016 and MozFest 2015/16. In all his interactions, he has shown himself to be eager to learn things, help others succeed and take on challenges while building out his technical and leadership skills.  Over the course of the past years, Max has emerged as a leader not only on his project, Cytoscape.js, but also in the broader community, helping to continually evolve our common understanding of open source practices in science.


Chris Foote

Chris Foote (Spike) is a professional Electronic Engineer with a passion for science and technology. He is an advocate for open technology, as well as technology for development, and has volunteered with a number of global organizations such as CrisisCommons, CrisisMappers, and OpenStreetMap (OSM). He has been active in the internet health movement as a MozFest volunteer for many years, and is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Spike has led and coordinated the volunteer program at MozFest for the last 4 years. He has worked hard to build a program where new volunteers feel welcomed and also understand why the Internet health movement is critical and how Mozilla contributes to the movement. He works hard to ensure the volunteers’ experience at the event is meaningful and worthwhile, taking the time to acknowledge people’s skills and interests. He also tirelessly campaigns to ensure MozFest volunteers get involved in other areas of contributing to the movement. He is a real community builder, mentoring, making connections, building collaborations, putting others first and always looking for new methods to make the process and relationships easier and long-lasting.


David Ross

David Ross is an open source and open data advocate, and an entrepreneur in the wearable tech space, building his startup using open principles. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Club Captain and MozFest volunteer. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

David is probably one of the biggest advocates for working in the open, reorganizing his whole business plan to ensure his startup is open. He has served as a MozFest volunteer for many years, helping spread the Internet health mission further. He is a committed learner, and integrates himself widely across many communities and meet-ups, always keeping a focus on the open-web mission. As a Mozilla Club Captain, David coordinates and teaches at web literacy events in London. He is invited to speak at tech events on issues of online privacy and security, using that platform to effectively disseminate a wider understanding of these key issues. Currently, as an Open Project Lead, he is helping further improve our understanding of open practices, and how to propagate them.


Gina Tesoriero

Gina Tesoriero is a networked education activist and an advocate for web literacy and digital inclusion. She currently works as a Special Education Teacher at the new York City Department of Education. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive NYC member, Club Captain, and MozFest volunteer. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”


Nathalie Rayter

Nathalie Rayter is an exemplary community builder and educator. She works as the STEM Teen Programs Manager at the Adler Planetarium, creating equitable opportunities for engaging youth people in science and technology. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive Chicago member and served as a member of its Advisory Committee in 2016. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Nathalie is a constant innovator and a tireless advocate for inclusive youth programs. She has led, supported, implemented, spread and shared a dozen projects funded by the Hive. Nathalie has developed programs at the Planetarium that mobilize her department to be intentional about the diversity of their participants, innovative in the experiential learning they provide and caring authentically for the youth they serve. She was instrumental in the development and production of the Maker Mob - a traveling maker party made of museums and organizations providing free activities at community events. In her current role as an Advisory Committee member, she has ensured our decisions are in the best interests of the community of educators in the network.


Greg McVerry

Greg McVerry is an Ed-Tech entrepreneur, teacher, and digital inclusion advocate. He works as an Associate Professor of Education at Southern Connecticut State University. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Club Captain and a technical contributor. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Greg drives the Internet health mission forward through his contributions as a participation lead, Mozilla Club Captain, curriculum tester, and Thimble champion. As a teacher, Greg naturally thinks about how our tools and curriculum will be received by learners. His thoughtful feedback about how Thimble is used in learning contexts helped us make important decisions about the user experience, the feature set, and the curricular content. He has been an active tester of our curriculum and has made valuable contributions, helping to increase the overall quality. He has taken many of the principles mentioned above into an Ed-Tech startup he founded to create technologies that develop the instructional capacity of teachers. Finally, Greg is one of the most active network members in Github, demonstrating a strong commitment to working and learning in the open.


Harry Smith

Harry Smith is an outstanding youth leader in our network, a committed volunteer and a student in Lancaster, UK. He has been active in the internet health movement as a MozFest volunteer. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Harry is one of our youngest community members and despite his youth, has already been a contributor for many years. His work is invaluable in creating connections between youth and science - an area that generally doesn’t get enough attention. He was an active participant in the Campus Campaign as well as Mozilla Study Groups. He helped deliver the Youth Zone Program at MozFest in 2015, teaching young people how to read, write and participate online. As a long-time MozFest volunteer, he has contributed to the success of the festival over the years. He is a passionate youth advocate, and his encouragement is leading other young people to become contributors to the Internet health movement, tools and programs.


Ian O'Byrne

Ian O'Byrne is an educator, researcher, and entrepreneur. His research examines the literacy practices of individuals as they read, write, and communicate in online and hybrid spaces. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Literacy Education at the College of Charleston. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Ian has been an active and engaged contributor on digital inclusion, web literacy, and open credentialing issues. He has actively contributed on evolving Mozilla’s Web Literacy work in education settings. He was also critical to creating and updating the Web Literacy Map and paper, which serves as the foundation for global digital inclusion efforts. For the Web Literacy Map 2.0 launched most recently, he collaborated and contributed content, research, and writing to the web literacy white paper and the structure of the new map.  Finally, he has been a key thought partner around the use of Digital Badges for Web Literacy.


Charles Canario

Charles Canario works at The James Baldwin School as a college coach and is an educator and a digital equity advocate. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Hive NYC member and is part of our first cohort of "Network50.”

As a young mentor and facilitator, Charles has been an exceptional leader within Hive NYC, initially in his role as a youth leader at Hive member organization Global Action Project, and most recently as an independent community member.  He brings a strong social justice lens to the Internet health movement, always pushing Mozilla to think deeper about its efforts towards diversity, inclusion, and equity.  Over the past year, he has worked closely with Hive NYC staff to lead online privacy and web literacy activities at community events throughout the city.  Charles has also contributed collaboratively on a new online privacy curriculum that is being developed specifically towards communities that aren't always reached in the technology field, such as immigrant and undocumented communities, youth of color, and young people from under-resourced schools.


Vladan Joler

Vladan Joler is a social justice advocate, activist, and a professor of new media at the University of Novi Sad and founder of Share Foundation, an organization that is dedicated to protecting the rights of Internet citizens. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Vladan is a collaborator and thought partner on the topic of privacy and security as well as decentralization decentralization, especially through alternative forms of networks, and how it relates to the Internet of Things. He participated in the first Mozilla-organized IoT event and developed a stream of research and prototyping around privacy. He then furthered these explorations by leading a participant group at follow-up events. His work has generated actionable insights about anonymity and modes of controlling connectivity, ranging from the Dark Temple to the Wayback Privacy Machine. He regularly publishes reflections on privacy and internet activism that contribute to our common understanding of advocacy, such as essays on Facebook’s algorithms and alternative forms of networks in Cuba. He is also developing curriculum and a university partnership that could contribute to growing new leaders in this space.


Dennis Ndegwa

Dennis Ndegwa is a technology professional, researcher and open data advocate. He is currently an Open Data Fellow at the ICT Authority, Government of Kenya. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Mozilla Rep and as an Open Researcher. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Dennis is an integral part of the Mozilla community in East Africa, having served as a Mozilla Rep for some time, and now as a researcher with the Digital Skills Observatory - a project that aims to find out how much equipping low-income earners (in Kenya) with digital skills will assist in improving their lives. He has been a critical reason for the success of the DSO project, helping design and develop 4 digital skills workshops and then bringing teams together to execute these workshops. He works closely with, leads, and learns from a community of practitioners and volunteers, and has learned to do this work in an open, transparent and thorough manner.


Eva Constantaras

Eva Constantaras is a journalist with Internews, specializing in investigative data journalism, specially as a tool to enhance transparency. She has been active in the internet health movement and a played an active role in the delivery of MozFest 2016. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Eva is an open-journalist, open practices advocate and an ardent supporter and a member of the open news network; she is also building the European open news network through support, advocacy and mentoring. Eva conducts trainings around the world and seeks out ways to connect the international community of media technologists. She also models open practices - never shying away from challenging situations or offering tough, critical feedback. Eva valuable in improving our work with the international journalism community, and has been crucial to expanding the relevance of MozFest to this community. She has invited and recruited several international journalists to the event, and has helped prototype and develop sessions last year and this year.


Su Adams

Su Adams is an entrepreneur, freelance educator, and a digital inclusion activist. She has been active in the Mozilla community as a Mozilla Clubs Regional Coordinator and MozFest contributor. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Su is always challenging the education norms, culture, and processes, pushing for them to be more open - and work in the open. She worked hard to bring the badging culture to school, and the curriculum. She has served as a Regional Coordinator for the last two years, on-boarding new club captains and providing continued support to ensure the ongoing success of clubs. She has been a long-time volunteer at MozFest, and was instrumental in designing a learning space at MozFest called Demystify the Web, providing opportunities for support, sharing, and learning about tools and methods for both new and existing educators. Su is a deeply committed contributor to the Open Movement as a mentor for CoderDojo and #a11yhacks.


Faye Tandog

Faye Tandog is a software professional and an active member of the Philippines technical community. She has been active in the Mozilla community in a variety of roles over the years. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Faye has been a long-standing contributor to the Mozilla community both in the Philippines and globally. She has served as a Firefox Student Ambassador, as a leader of the Women and Mozilla initiative in the Philippines, and as a Mozilla Rep, receiving worldwide recognition repeatedly for her outstanding contributions in that role. She also served as an adviser to the global FSA program and is now a member of the worldwide Campus Advisory Committee for Mozilla Campus Clubs. As part of the mentorship program, under the Open Project, she's working to create curriculum and resources collaboratively to train student leaders. She is a leader in the Digital Inclusion and Web Literacy space generally, having served as a facilitator of MakerSpace Manila. The Internet health movement is stronger because of the commitment and efforts of young leaders like her.


Amy Lee

Amy Lee is a microbiologist, bioinformatician, and an Open Science advocate, currently working as a researcher analyzing large genomic data to understand immunity and infection at the University of British Columbia. She has been active in the internet health movement as a Study Group Lead. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Amy has been critical to the success of our Mozilla Science Lab, building and leading the first Study Group. Amy's passion for supporting peer-to-peer learning really set the Science Lab in motion - helping model how local leadership can carry the mission forward. As the first Study Group Lead, Amy had to evolve a model of how study groups would operate, and what these groups can expect from the Study Group Lead. She has developed and delivered high-quality programs and curriculum, built a community and is now helping, inspiring and mentoring others to succeed. She has also advanced our working open mission by developing curriculum and participating in events that show others how to work openly.  She's been a dedicated supporter and collaborator, across the Study Group program, Open Science Leadership Summit, and the main MozFest stage.


Priyanka Nag

Priyanka Nag is a technology professional, open source advocate and an integral member of the Mozilla India community. She has been active in the internet health movement in a variety of roles over the years. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Priyanka is a long-term contributor to the Internet health and Open Source movement in India, and has a long history of contribution, at Mozilla and also with the Wikimedia Foundation. Within Mozilla, she has been actively engaged as a MozFest volunteer. Over the years as a MozFest advocate she has brought many people from the Mozilla Global community to MozFest to learn about our issues, organize and stimulate their own communities to engage with issues that are critical to an open, accessible, and transparent web. Priyanka has been a great resource to new contributors, helping them connect with people, tools and resources within Mozilla and beyond.


Caitlin Stanton

Caitlin Stanton is an entrepreneur, a young digital activist and a freshman at Cornell University. She has been active in the internet health movement as a partner and learning advocate. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Caitlin co-founded def hacks(), a 24 hour hackathon designed for high school students, by high school students, with her co-founder Emily Redler, as a method for helping young people learn to code in a supportive environment while gaining access and mentorship from professionals in digital fields. She approached Mozilla as a partner to bring more knowledge about why open practices matter to hackathon participants. She grew def hacks() to several new cities, including new York, San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, and London, after its first year and then mentored others to take the reigns as she entered college last fall. Her commitment to digital activism is also illustrated by her leadership roles with the PixieHacks hackathon and Women in Computing at Cornell. Through her assorted contributions, she has demonstrated outstanding commitment to supporting her peers as they seek to learn and develop their coding, creativity and collaboration skills.


Randy Macdonald

Randy Macdonald is a teacher and networked education activist. He currently works as a Program Manager at the Technology Association of Oregon Foundation. He has been active in the internet health movement as a Mozilla Club Captain. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Randy demonstrates a clear commitment to the Internet health through efforts to teach young people to read, write, and participate on the web. He currently directs an initiative that provides STEM-based after school programs for youth in Oregon. He also trains others to teach computational and design-based thinking skills for solving community problems using mobile technology. He has been an active participant in web literacy leaders training and in integrating badges in afterschool and informal learning environments. His work with high school-age youth has contributed greatly to our common understanding of out-of-school time programming and digital credentials. He is launching 10 Mozilla Clubs focused on teaching web literacy skills to youth throughout Oregon, and as a Regional Coordinator aims to expand the program beyond his local community.


Georgia Bullen

Georgia Bullen is a civic innovator and open technology advocate. She currently works as the Director of Tech Projects at new America's Open Technology Institute. She has been active in the internet health movement as a MozFest volunteer, a mentor with the Open Web Fellowship program, and a collaborator in the fight to protect Net Neutrality worldwide. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Georgia is a strong advocate for open data practices and transparency, and is deeply engaged in the global open internet fight. She has been a long-term activist in the Internet health movement, and Mozilla, both through her work with OTI and as an individual who seems to have her finger on all the pulses around open internet issues. She's very passionate about issues like copyright, net neutrality and community engagement to ensure fair access to a high-quality internet experience. As a mentor for one of our Open Web Fellows, she both guided the fellow's project at MeasurementLab, and help the fellow navigate the confusing world of internet policy and advocacy. She's an advocate for women in technology, and works to connect people to raise the profile of their work, and make the whole bigger than the sum of its parts.


William Duyck (FuzzyFox)

William Duyck (FuzzyFox) is a technologist who, in his own words, ‘wants to make the web a better place for the average user, to help them on their journeys to web literacy and participatory culture, and make great tools to support them in their everyday lives.’ He has been active in the internet health movement as a Mozilla Rep, an intern and a MozFest volunteer. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

FuzzyFox has been an advocate for all things open since he was 14 years old. For many years, he has volunteered his time and helped make MozFest a success every year. He's been an active community member, presenting and sharing his work with others at conferences such as FOSDEM. As a Mozilla Rep, he supports existing and future local community efforts and programs, and also recruits, supports and mentors future Mozilla Reps. He worked with Mozilla as an intern and during that time, led many train-the-trainer events and also supported different after school web literacy programs. After his internship, he went back to school to finish up his degree, to drive the open source community forward for years to come.


Paul Oh

Paul Oh is an educator, a frequent blogger and long-distance collaborator who is used to open forms of production and sharing, especially in his technology and community-building work. He currently works as the Senior Director at Teaching Channel. He has been active in the internet health movement as the co-producer of the Mozilla Curriculum Workshop webcast. He is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Paul is a long-time champion of web literacy. He pushed the National Writing Project (NWP), during his work there, to champion web literacy and online composition as key forms of knowledge and production for the network. He inspires teachers to be more open in their teaching and learning. Most importantly, he strives to develop diverse and inclusive communities of practice wherever he works and, especially in his current and past role, helped manage widely distributed networks of practice that decentralized power into the hands of innovative teachers and their students. His work is dedicated to surfacing others' processes and successes in hope of helping educators replicate each other's best work.


Mmaki Jantjies

Mmaki Jantjies works as the Head of the Department, Information Systems at the University of the Western Cape, and is a committed advocate and contributor to technology-for-development. She has been active in the internet health movement asa Regional Coordinator. She is a member of our first cohort of "Network50.”

Mmaki is an experienced teacher and technology professor and serves the network as the Regional Coordinator of the Mozilla Clubs for Women and Girls Program in Cape Town South Africa. In that role, she is helping coordinate five clubs in one province and starting new clubs in two other provinces. The clubs she organizes enables female students at the University of Western Cape to teach web literacy to girls in local high schools and develop their leadership skills. Her work increases digital literacy and also helps girls and women in her community develop the required agency to implement the change they dream of and visualize.